SD26

If words don't have any meaning, policy debates are a lot easier:

"I am specifically in favor of a fair tax and of reforming our tax system," [Senator-elect Brian Nieves] said. "I think our current taxing system is regressive, not progressive - in all of the fair tax studies that I have seen, it would actually lower our tax burden on each individual Missourian."

A fair tax would replace income tax with a consumption tax on retail goods.

"Right now there are tons of people earning income who never pay taxes," Nieves said. "Like a drug dealer who might make $100,000 and never pays a penny of income tax." Those people making money illegally still spend and many actually spend more - this would create a more fair environment, and recoup the tax dollars of people making money illegally."

Opponents of the fair tax say those who make between $15,000 and $200,000 would be taxed much more than those who make more than $200,000, among other criticisms.

Nieves captures the argument of "Fair Tax" supporters perfectly here:  The state will still have enough money to pay its current obligations (they say), but somehow "it would actually lower our tax burden on each individual Missourian."  No way this isn't too good to be true! 

And the idea that folks might make the relatively short drive across state lines to avoid Missouri's new quite high sales tax?  This is where right-wingers suddenly forget all of their own talk about how tax policies can encourage or discourage people to make certain choices.  Sodontworryaboutit!

The apparent exceptions in this fantasy world in which everybody wins -- and this is brand new information to me -- are your local drug dealers, who would no longer be able to keep their black market money away from a much higher sales tax.  Brilliant!  Maybe we can even ask them to start collecting sales taxes on their illicit drug sales?  I can see the campaign commercials now....

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